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Showing posts from May, 2018

Centrists Are the Most Hostile to Democracy, Not Extremists By David Adler, New York Times, May 23, 2018

A rally last September in Berlin for Martin Schulz, the Social Democrats’ candidate for German chancellor.Maja Hitij/Getty Images The warning signs are flashing red: Democracy is under threat. Across Europe and North America, candidates are more authoritarian, party systems are more volatile, and citizens are more hostile to the norms and institutions of liberal democracy. These trends have prompted a major debate between those who view political discontent as economic, cultural or generational in origin. But all of these explanations share one basic assumption: The threat is coming from the political extremes. On the right, ethno-nationalists and libertarians are accused of supporting fascist politics; on the left, campus radicals and the so-called antifa movement are accused of betraying liberal principles. Across the board, the assumption is that radical views go hand in hand with support for authoritarianism, while moderation suggests a more committed approach to the democratic pr…

In US psychotic voices are violent, in Africa and India, they are more benign and playful. JULY 16, 2014

In the USA psychotic voices are violent, in Africa and India, they are more benign and playful.JULY 16, 2014








Stanford anthropologist Tanya Luhrmann found that voice-hearing experiences of people with serious psychotic disorders are shaped by local culture – in the United States, the voices are harsh and threatening; in Africa and India, they are more benign and playful. This may have clinical implications for how to treat people with schizophrenia, she suggests.
BY CLIFTON B. PARKER https://news.stanford.edu/2014/07/16/voices-culture-luhrmann-071614/

People suffering from schizophrenia may hear “voices” – auditory hallucinations – differently depending on their cultural context, according to new Stanford research. In the United States, the voices are harsher, and in Africa and India, more benign, said Tanya Luhrmann, a Stanford professor of anthropology and first author of the article in the British Journal of Psychiatry. The experience of hearing voices is complex and varies from person to…

Canada, the Korean Dispute and Foreign Policy Mythology by Yves Engler / May 26th, 2018

by Yves Engler / May 26th, 2018 dissidentvoice.org Repeat after me: Canada is seldom a force for good in the world, Canada is seldom a force for good in the world. Thomas Walkom’s “Canada should board Korean peace train” is yet another example of how the progressive end of the dominant media has been seduced by Canadian foreign policy mythology. The leftist Toronto Star columnist offers an astute analysis of what’s driving rapprochement on the Korean Peninsula. He points out that the two Koreas are moving the process forward and that Pyongyang believes “complete denuclearization” of the Peninsula includes the US forces in the region aiming nuclear weapons at it. But, Walkom’s column is cloaked in naivety about Canada’s role in the geopolitical hotspot. He ignores the international summit Ottawa and Washington organized in January to promote sanctions on North Korea. In a highly belligerent move, the countries invited to the conference in Vancouver were those that fought against North …

Revolution or Decadence? Thoughts on the Transition between Modes of Production on the Occasion of the Marx Bicentennial by Samir Amin May 01, 2018

Revolution or Decadence? Thoughts on the Transition between Modes of Production on the Occasion of the Marx Bicentennialby May 01, 2018
Thomas Couture, Romans during the Decadence, 1847. Samir Amin is the director of the Third World Forum in Dakar, Senegal, and the author of many books, most recently Modern Imperialism, Monopoly Finance Capital, and Marx’s Law of Value(Monthly Review Press, 2018). Introduction Karl Marx is a giant thinker, not just for the nineteenth century, but even more for understanding our contemporary time. No other attempt to develop an understanding of society has been as fertile, provided “Marxists” move beyond “Marxology” (simply repeating what Marx was able to write in relation to his own time) and instead pursue his method in accordance with new developments in history. Marx himself continuously developed and revised his views throughout his lifetime. Marx never reduced capitalism to a new mode of production. He considered all the dimensions of mo…